Preventing War with Non-Interventionism

July 30, 2014 – Tom Woods

110121-O-9999G-001 GULF OF MEXICO (Jan. 21, 2011) The Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) William P. Lawrence (DDG 110) conducts steering and propulsion systems tests during combined super trials in the Gulf of Mexico. Super trials are the final milestone before the ship's delivery. (U.S. Navy photo courtesy of Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding/Released)
110121-O-9999G-001
GULF OF MEXICO (Jan. 21, 2011) The Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) William P. Lawrence (DDG 110) conducts steering and propulsion systems tests during combined super trials in the Gulf of Mexico. Super trials are the final milestone before the ship’s delivery. (U.S. Navy photo courtesy of Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding/Released)

talks with Stanford University Hoover Institute Research Fellow David Henderson about non-interventionist foreign policy during “World War Week” on The Tom Woods Show. Henderson recently gave a speech earlier this year called “An Economist’s Case for a Non-Interventionist Foreign Policy,” to a group of foreign navy officers.

Describing his speech, Henderson says:

I don’t come across as someone on the left, and almost everything they’ve heard from intellectuals on foreign policy is from people on the left. That’s not to say they don’t have a lot to offer. But they don’t make the arguments I do. So I made kind of a Misesian, unintended consequences argument—you know how he talks about in domestic policy. If you impose a price control to this problem you can either get rid of the price control or you can just intervene further. Governments tend to intervene further. That tends to cause new problems. I used that kind of argument in foreign policy.

What are your thoughts on non-interventionism?

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