U.S. Foreign Aid – Is It Money Well Spent?

August 12, 2014 – American tax dollars have

Crowley Logistics in Miami, FL on Friday, August 26, 2011 is one of three U.S. Agency for International Development shipping and logistics facilities in the nation. In times of emergency humanitarian relief aid, they can respond with supplies delivered to an aircraft at Miami International Airport within two hours. They utilize articulating forklifts, which hinge in the middle to store and retrieve pallets of supplies through narrow aisle ways.  This allows for a higher density of stored supplies in the warehouse.  Pallets of supplies are stacked three levels high. USAID provides humanitarian assistance through the Office of U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance (OFDA). OFDA is the lead U.S. Government (USG) office charged with providing and coordinating USG humanitarian assistance in response to international emergencies and disasters.  To achieve this, USAID works in cooperation with other USG offices such as the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), and international humanitarian experts. The USDA provides food assistance to support emergency feeding programs in countries experiencing food shortages due to drought and civil conflict. USDA Photo by Lance Cheung.
Crowley Logistics in Miami, FL on Friday, August 26, 2011 is one of three U.S. Agency for International Development shipping and logistics facilities in the nation. In times of emergency humanitarian relief aid, they can respond with supplies delivered to an aircraft at Miami International Airport within two hours. They utilize articulating forklifts, which hinge in the middle to store and retrieve pallets of supplies through narrow aisle ways. This allows for a higher density of stored supplies in the warehouse. Pallets of supplies are stacked three levels high. USAID provides humanitarian assistance through the Office of U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance (OFDA). OFDA is the lead U.S. Government (USG) office charged with providing and coordinating USG humanitarian assistance in response to international emergencies and disasters. To achieve this, USAID works in cooperation with other USG offices such as the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), and international humanitarian experts. The USDA provides food assistance to support emergency feeding programs in countries experiencing food shortages due to drought and civil conflict. USDA Photo by Lance Cheung.

been used for years to prop up economic and military programs around the world. Proponents view foreign aid as investments that can save lives. At the same time, foreign aid can drag nations into a cycle of dependence. Mismanagement of those dollars can lead to significant waste and worse. In the hands of the corrupt, foreign aid dollars have been spent on luxury items.
A few examples – The Guardian newspaper reported in 2007 that the U.S. sent $12 billion in cash shrink wrapped on pallets to Iraq with no control over who was receiving it and how it was being spent. Spiegel reported in 2010 that the Afghan government had siphoned off millions of U.S. foreign aid dollars to purchase luxury villas in Dubai. And in 2012, DevEx published an article stating that $13 million in aid money that was reportedly embezzled through the office of the prime minister of Uganda.
Here’s a list of the countries we are giving the most money to, using data for the 2015 fiscal year:
>Israel, $3.1 billion
>Afghanistan, $1.6 billion
>Egypt, $1.5 billion
>Pakistan, $881.8 million
>Nigeria, $720.9 million

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What are your thoughts on the way our foreign aid program works (or doesn’t work)?

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