US Post Office: No News Delivery if Marijuana Ads Included

December 21, 2015—”Neither usps_marijuanasnow nor rain nor heat nor gloom of night” keeps the US Post Office from delivering your mail, so the legend goes. But even a sunny day won’t guarantee you a newspaper delivery if there are marijuana advertisements in print.

Oregon, Washington, Colorado, Alaska, and the District of Columbia have legalized marijuana in their own ways, while 23 other states have medical marijuana programs. Based on what the Post Office told Oregon, about half the country is at risk of not having newspapers with weed-pushing ads delivered.

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Now four federal Oregon politicians, Congressman Earl Blumenauer, Congresswoman Suzanne Bonamici, Senator Ron Wyden and Senator Jeff Merkley, all Democrats, are appealing to the Post Office to respect states’ rights. From The Washington Post:

“’We are working as a delegation to quickly find the best option to address this agency’s intransigence,’ the four Democrats wrote, according to published reports. ‘Unfortunately, the outdated federal approach to marijuana as described in the response from the Postal Service undermines and threatens news publications that choose to accept advertising from legal marijuana businesses in Oregon and other states where voters also have freely decided to legalize marijuana.’

A top Postal Service wrote back last week.

‘Based on our review of the [law], we have concluded that advertisements for the sale of marijuana are non-mailable,’ wrote Thomas Marshall, USPS general counsel and executive vice president, according to published reports.”

Democrats promoting states’ rights? Share your thoughts with a comment below!

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